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Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dynamic and equilibrium studies of solutions containing surfactants. found in the catalog.

Dynamic and equilibrium studies of solutions containing surfactants.

Derek Melvin Bloor

Dynamic and equilibrium studies of solutions containing surfactants.

by Derek Melvin Bloor

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Published by University of Salford in Salford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

PhD thesis, Chemistry.

SeriesD37952/81
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21684738M

Surfactants today you have probably eaten some, or rubbed others on your body. Plants, animals (including you) and microorganisms make them, and many everyday products (e.g. detergents, cosmetics, foodstuffs) contain them. Surfactant molecules have one part which is soluble in water and another which is not. This gives surfactant molecules two valuable properties: 1) they adsorb at . Analysis of the equilibrium and dynamic surface tension of epoxidized soybean oil grafted hydroxyethyl cellulose (H-ESO-HEC) surfactants with different molecular weights were carried out at pH values that ranged from 8 to A variation in the surface activity of the H-ESO-HEC surfactants .

Equilibrium and Dynamic Investigation on the Main Phase Transition of Dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine Vesicles Containing Polypeptides: A DSC and Iodine Laser T-Jump Study . Surfactant solutions are usually used under conditions accompanied by transient dynamic surfaces, and therefore the dynamic surface tension (DST) is important in many industrial processes. Theories regarding DST have been developed exclusively on the adsorption theory that molecules are transported from bulk solution to the by:

This article discusses the principles and action of surfactants, with particular emphasis on the most general case of small surfactant molecules with long hydrocarbon chains. Surfactants, also called amphiphilic molecules, are an essential part of many soft condensed matter systems where their basic role is to stabilize interfaces between different component materials.   Table 2 lists the measured equilibrium surface tension of the surfactant solutions (in PBS buffer) as well as literature values for solutions containing the same or similar (for the BCP) surfactants at their critical micelle concentrations in distilled water. Our measured values are in reasonable agreement with the literature values, with the Cited by:


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Dynamic and equilibrium studies of solutions containing surfactants by Derek Melvin Bloor Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this study, the effects of cosurfactant on phase equilibrium and dynamic behavior were studied in systems containing nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP) surfactant solutions and. Dynamic and equilibrium studies of solutions containing surfactants Author: Bloor, D.

ISNI: Awarding Body: University of Salford Current Institution: University of Salford Date of Award: Availability of Full Text. Mori F., Lim J.C., Miller C.A. () Equilibrium and dynamic behavior of a system containing a mixture of anionic and nonionic surfactants.

In: Lindman B., Rosenholm J.B., Stenius P. (eds) Surfactants and Macromolecules: Self-Assembly at Interfaces and in Bulk. Progress in Colloid & Polymer Science, vol Steinkopff.

First Online 28 January Cited by: Equilibrium and dynamic surface tension measurements for aqueous surfactant solutions at 23°C (gives dynamic σ at 50 ms, and, give equilibrium σ).

The effect of increased bulk temperature (80°C) on both the dynamic and equilibrium σ for the different surfactant solutions is depicted in Fig. by:   Specifically, the only required inputs to the theoretical framework presented here are the molecular structures and the diffusion coefficients of each surfactant component comprising the mixture and a single equilibrium surface tension measurement for solutions containing each of the individual surfactant by:   The equilibrium and dynamic surface tension of three sulfosuccinate surfactants at the air/aqueous solution interface were investigated.

Wilhelmy plate method was used to determine critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the equilibrium surface tension (γ eq). The dynamic surface tensions in the range 10– s were measured by maximum bubble pressure by: We use cookies to make interactions with our website easy and meaningful, to better understand the use of our services, and to tailor advertising.

In this study, the effect of cosurfactant on the phase equilibrium and dynamic behavior was studied in systems containing NP7 nonionic surfactant solutions and nonpolar hydrocarbon oils.

The air‐solution equilibrium tension, γc and dynamic surface tension, γt, of aqueous solutions of a novel ionic surfactant benzyltrimethylammonium bromide (BTAB) were measured by Wilhelmy.

The model parameters used for the theoretical calculations of the surface tension and dynamical adsorption for mixed TX45/TX solutions were the same as those obtained in, from equilibrium and dynamic surface tension and dilational rheological characteristics of the individual TX45 and TX surfactants.

These parameters, with the subscripts notation corresponding to that introduced Cited by: 9. A theoretical framework is developed for the treatment of electrostatic effects associated with the adsorption of zwitterionic surfactants, either as a single species or when mixed with ionic or nonionic surfactants, at the air−aqueous solution interface.

A notable advantage of this theoretical framework is that it can be used to predict the interfacial properties of aqueous mixtures that Cited by: We report results of a theoretical study of the adsorption of mixtures of ionic and nonionic surfactants at the aqueous solution−air interface.

A surface equation of state is developed by treating the adsorbed surfactant molecules as a two-dimensional gaslike monolayer consisting of hard disks interacting through attractive van der Waals interactions and repulsive electrostatic by: Dynamic Surface Tension in Concentrated Solutions of C nE m Surfactants: A Comparison between the Theory and Experiment B.

Zhmud, F. Tiberg,* and J. Kizling Institute for Surface Chemistry YKI, BoxStockholm SE 86, Sweden Received Aug Dynamic and equilibrium surface tension experiments were carried out to study the adsorption kinetics of mixtures of the nonionic polymer hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) with two double chain.

The chemical equilibrium of surfactant molecules with bound counterions is expressed by Eq. (ii) The micellization constant K 1 (mic) is the same in Eqs., which describe, respectively, the ionized and non-ionized surfactants. Thus, the number of parameters in the model is reduced, which considerably simplifies the theoretical description of by: The foamability, and the equilibrium and dynamic surface tensions of the surfactant solutions are measured in wide range of surfactant and electrolyte concentrations.

From the dynamic surface tension we determined the dependence of the surfactant adsorption, surface coverage, and instantaneous surface elasticity on the surface age of the bubbles, viz. along the formation of the dynamic adsorption layer Author: B.

Petkova, S. Tcholakova, M. Chenkova, K. Golemanov, N. Denkov, D. Thorley, S. Stoyanov, S. Stoyano. Purchase Surfactants: Chemistry, Interfacial Properties, Applications, Volume 13 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1.

A molecular-thermodynamic theory is developed to model the adsorption of surfactant mixtures at the oil−water interface. The use of experimentally determined parameters is minimized by utilizing a theoretical description that is based on the molecular characteristics of the surfactants.

Specifically, the adsorbed surfactant molecules are modeled as a two-dimensional nonideal gaslike Cited by: The influence of surfactant solution on oil/water dynamic interfacial tension was studied in this part. In this experiment, different concentration surfactant solutions were used to measure oil/water dynamic interfacial tension by spinning drop method.

The result of interfacial tension is shown in Fig. The additive molecular mobility at interfaces manifests in a dynamic surface tension behavior (surfactant adsorption–desorption at the liquid–vapor interface), and varying surface wetting (contact angle) with concentration (surfactant physisorption at the solid–liquid interface).Cited by:.

This book is unique in that it discusses the solution chemistry of both surfactants and polymers and also the interactions between the two. The book, which is based on successful courses given by the authors sinceis a revised and extended version of the first edition that became a market success with six reprints since Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion.

Librivox Free Audiobook. Podcasts. Featured software All software latest This Just In Old School Emulation MS-DOS Games Historical Software Classic PC Games Software Library.In the tradition of the popular first edition, Analysis of Surfactants, Second Edition offers a comprehensive and practical account of analysis methods for determining and understanding commercially important surfactants-individually and in compounds.

Combining a complete review of the literature with a variety of evaluation procedures and the specifications for commercial products, this 4/5(2).